Newsletter

    
August 2020
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HRDR Blog: Wellness Reminders During COVID-19

It has been five months since California declared a shelter in place order for all non-essential employees. The past five months have been full of constant change and adjusting to the “new normal”. How can we keep ourselves and our employees mentally and physically well during this time?

Missed our post? Read it here.

Navigating Employee Travel During a Global Pandemic

As California continues to lift restrictions, more and more people are thinking about summer vacations. As employers, it is important to know what you can and cannot ask your employees about their planned trips. While you cannot restrict where your employees travel on their personal time, you may ask them certain questions and take appropriate action.

While employees still have a right to privacy, employers may ask certain questions of their vacation. Permitted inquiries include asking if they are traveling to a Centers for Disease Control (CDC) hotspot and their method of travel. Make sure you are not discouraging your employee from traveling as this could encourage employees to not disclose their travel plans and open your workplace to risk of exposure.

Employees should give as much advanced notice as possible when planning trips so necessary steps can be taken. If the employee is required to self-quarantine after traveling, they would most likely not qualify for Emergency Paid Sick leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) unless instructed to quarantine by a doctor. While employees working remote would not be covered by this travel policy, it would apply to employees who work remote but still visit the office occasionally.

Once a travel policy is implemented, it is important that it is enforced consistently throughout the company. All employees should be held to the same requirements to avoid potential unfair employment claims. Reach out to your consultant for assistance with creating a COVID vacation policy.

Reminder: Harassment Prevention Training Deadline is 12/31

COVID-19 has been dominating much of the spotlight lately. However, it is important to remember that employers with five or more employees must complete harassment prevention training for all employees by December 31, 2020. Ask a member of your consulting team for session requirements and methods to complete the training virtually.

Implementing a Remote Work Policy

Remember back to mid-March when we were informed of the new shelter-in-place restrictions? Many employers found themselves coordinating technology, phone systems, and other infrastructure in brand new ways. A remote work policy may not have been at the top of your list. As this pandemic shows no signs of going away anytime soon, now is a great time to implement a policy.

Regardless of the remote arrangement being long term or short term, there are items that should be covered in all remote work policies. Set clear, defined expectations for communication and response times.

Work Location

While your employees may be allowed to work away from the office, employers are able to set designated work locations such as restricting the work location to the employee’s home address. This is important for employees who must visit the office periodically on short notice or to ensure employees are always using safe, secure internet.

Non-Exempt Employees

Non-exempt employees are still held to the same wage and hour requirements as if they were in the office. Meal and rest breaks need to be taken at the proper time and all overtime should be recorded. There are many items to consider when non-exempt employees are working from home, including meal and rest breaks and proper payment of overtime.

Expense Reimbursement

Per the California Labor Code, all employees are entitled to be reimbursed “for all necessary expenditures or losses incurred by the employee…” This is true especially when working away from the office. Employees may be entitled to reimbursement for Wi-Fi, electricity, cell phone usage, or other necessities. To avoid the administrative burden of tracking these items and usage individually, a best practice is to assign a flat monthly amount that you believe reasonably covers an employee’s expenses.

In Summary

Having a remote work policy in place is important. A policy can help your employees understand what is expected of them and communication requirements. Your consulting team is available to assist you with a tailored policy for your organization.

Healthy Student Guidance Released by Kaiser

Kaiser has released a playbook to offer useful tools to help maintain the health of students during this time. While schools are still relying on local health officials to determine to reopening requirements, this playbook can offer guidance whether you are returning virtually, in-person, or a hybrid. The full playbook can be found here.

HR Action Items: Updated FMLA Forms

The Department of Labor has released updated Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) forms. While the updated DOL forms can be found here, it is important to remember that federal forms are not always California compliant. Reach out to a member of the HRDR team for guidance on the proper forms.

Holiday Office Closure

Our offices will be closed Monday, September 7, 2020 in observance of the Labor Day holiday. We will respond to all emails and voicemails when normal business hours resume September 8.

    
July 2020
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Blog Post: California Rolls Back Re-Opening Plan

On July 12, 2020, Governor Newsom announced that California would institute an order of additional stay at home restrictions. The only thing that is certain is that things will remain ever-changing.

Now is the time for employers to be focused on the safety of their employees as well as staying connected to those who may be working remote.

Missed our post? Read it here.

FFCRA Compensation Reporting on Form W2

The IRS and US Treasury Department has released guidance on compensation earned under the Families First Coronavirus Relief Act (FFCRA). Employers will be required to report wages paid to employees in either Box 14 on the employees Form W2 or another statement provided with the Form W2.

The guidance also provides those that are self-employed and an employee with information that is required to be able to claim the tax credits related to their self-employment.

EEO Reporting Extension

Employers that are required to submit Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) reporting will not be required to do so in 2020. The US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) announced that the following reports have been delayed:

  • The 2019 EEO-1 Component 1 (private employers with 100+ employees and certain federal contractors)
  • The 2020 EEO-3 (local referral unions with 100+ members)
  • The 2020 EEO-5 (public elementary and secondary school districts with 100+ employees)
  • New dates will be announced with an expected open date of early 2021.

    Trump Administration Doubles Down on Religious Exemption

    On July 8, 2020, the Supreme Court upheld the expanded exemptions related to contraceptive coverage. Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), health plans are required to provide coverage for “additional preventive care and screenings” without passing along any cost to the insured. This includes birth control and contraceptives.

    The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) previously allowed certain exemptions under the Obama administration for religious institutions and non-profits. Under the current administration, the eligibility for the exemption has greatly expanded to include private employers who have a moral or religious objection.

    What does this mean exactly? If an employer has a strong religious or moral objection to the use of birth control and contraceptives, they may now opt out of providing the ACA’s mandated contraceptive coverage.

        
    June 2020
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    Respect in the Workplace

    There has been a surge in conversations about race, policing, politics, and justice since the death of George Floyd on May 30. While the death of George Floyd sparked the current movement, names such as Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and Trayvon Martin have also been center stage in the media. How does this impact the workplace? Click here to read the full article.

    Updated Model COBRA Notices

    The US Department of Labor issued updates to the model COBRA notice on May 1, 2020. Group Health plans should use the updated notice to comply with required COBRA notifications. The updates aim to assist beneficiaries in having a better understanding of the relationship between COBRA and Medicare. Additional information can be found on the DOL’s FAQ.

    Supreme Court Passes Landmark Title VII Ruling

    On Monday, June 15, 2020, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that “an employer who fired an individual merely for being gay or transgender defies the law,” according to Justice Neil M. Gorsuch. This ruling stems from the definition of “sex” under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Gorsuch added “An employer who fires an individual for being homosexual or transgender fires that person for traits or actions it would not have questioned in members of a different sex.”

    Missed our post? Read it here.

    Paycheck Protection Program Amendments

    On June 5, President Trump signed the Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act (PPPFA) which allows employers greater flexibility when using Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) funds. While the initial plan was passed in March 2020, employers have given feedback that the requirements for forgiveness would be tough to meet. The intention behind the PPP was to assist small employers (those with less than 500 employees) with keeping their employees on payroll.

    Employers who received PPP funds will now have 24 weeks or until December 31 to use their funds. This is a drastic change from the previous eight-week requirement. The amount that needs to be spent on payroll costs is now down to 60% from 75%.

    Examples of payroll costs would be:

    • Employee wages including salaries, tips, or commissions
    • Employee benefits which covers insurance premiums, paid leave, and retirement benefits
    • State and local taxes on pay

    The remaining 40% of funds may be used on items like rent, utilities, or interest on mortgage payments. You should speak with your CPA, accounting professional, or banking representative for more detailed information.

    Employers now have until December 31 to re-hire employees who were laid off instead of the previous June 30 deadline. Exceptions may apply and are determined based on employee availability. The PPPFA also allows borrowers the ability to defer payroll taxes while remaining eligible for forgiveness.

    While this is a high-level summary of the new PPPFA, this is not all-encompassing. Please reach out to your lender for questions, clarification, or additional information.

    Local Minimum Wage Increases Effective July 1

    Thirteen California localities have minimum wage increases effective July 1, 2020. Employees who are paid minimum wage should receive an increase. The localities are:

    • Alameda
    • Berkley
    • Emeryville
    • Fremont
    • LA City
    • LA County
    • Malibu
    • Milpitas
    • Novato
    • Pasadena
    • San Francisco
    • San Leandro
    • Santa Monica
    • Santa Rosa

    Important note: Salary requirements for exempt employees is calculated using the state minimum wage, not the local rate. Despite the increase on July 1, the salary requirement is still $49,920 annually for employers with 25 or fewer employees and $54,080 annually for employers with 26 or more employees.

    Office Closures

    We will be closed Friday, June 26 for our annual Done Right team appreciation day. We will be back to normal business hours Monday, June 29.

    We will also be closed Friday, July 3 in observance of the Independence Day holiday. We will respond to emails and voicemails when normal business hours resume July 6.

        
    May 2020
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    Returning to Work Post-Coronavirus

    With the first phase of easing the stay at home order underway this week, slowly but surely, California is getting back to work.

    Overall, the safety and health of your employees, and assuring them you are ready to comply with any requirements specific to your industry and local ordinance is imperative. Have your ordered appropriate PPE? Masks, hand sanitizer, disinfecting wipes and gloves are a few of the recommended or required items to have on hand and available.

    Social distancing should also be enforced. This may include moving desks, rotating employees into workstations, or even staggering employees working from home when possible. If there is a shared break room or lunch area, consider removing seating to limit the amount of people that can congregate at the same time.

    Employees should prepare themselves that when they return to work, it will not be “business as usual” for some time. Employers may find it beneficial to schedule a virtual training or town hall meeting to discuss the changes and new protocols prior to re-opening. Topics to cover may include a staggered re-opening plan, new cleaning requirements, a change in operating hours, social distancing reminders and other specific steps your company is taking to make the transition back to work a smooth one.

    We have included some of the most frequently asked questions to date regarding returning to work. If you have a question that is not addressed, please reach out to a member of the consulting team for guidance.

    Question: What sort of plan or policy do I need to have in place before I start bringing my employees back to work?

    Answer: An exposure control plan should be defined and in place prior to bringing your employees back or as close to the return date as possible. Items that should be included in this plan are protocols for sending employees home, contact tracing in case an employee becomes sick with COVID-19, and cleaning requirements through the work area. This is not an exhaustive list. Please speak with a member of the consulting team to determine what should be covered in your specific exposure control plan.

    Question: When we re-open and bring our employees back, do they need to be put through our regular new hire process?

    Answer: Maybe. If the employee remained on your payroll, they may just need to be re-activated in your system. A change in status form should be used to document the return date in the personnel file.

    If the employment relationship was terminated and the employee was removed from payroll, you may need to go through your usual new hire process with the employee. Depending on how long the employee was gone, this may include a background check, new Form I-9, or benefits enrollment. Reach out to your consulting team for guidance on which scenario works best.

    Question: Can I require my employees to wear masks?

    Answer: Yes. However, if you require masks, you must be prepared to provide them to your employees or reimburse them for their own purchase. Also be alert to specific ordinances which may require masks, regardless of employer preference.

    Question: What happens if one of my employees requests an accommodation to not wear a mask?

    Answer: Some employees may have a medical or religious purpose to not wear a mask. If an employee requests an accommodation, employers should enter into the interactive process with the employee to determine if an accommodation can be made.

    Question: Can I take the temperatures of my employees before they enter the workplace?

    Answer: Yes. Until further guidance is issued, employees can be required to have their temperatures taken before they begin work. Non-exempt employees must be compensated for this time. If an employee has a high temperature and is sent home, reporting time ray rules would apply.

    It is important to note that California employers may be subject to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). If this is the case, you are required to provide your employees with a compliant notice prior to or at the time of the collection of data. Reach out to your consulting team for this resource.

    Question: Are employees able to refuse to return to work, even after the order is lifted?

    Answer: An employee may refuse to return to work only if they believe they are in imminent and immediate danger. The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) states that an imminent danger is “any conditions or practices in any place of employment which are such that a danger exists which could reasonably be expected to cause death or serious physical harm immediately or before the imminence of such danger can be eliminated through the enforcement procedures otherwise provided by this Act.” Additional information about the requirements to meet an “imminent threat” can be found here.

    Question: We have called our employees back into the office. One of our employees still has a child at home due to a school closure. Would they qualify for any type of leave?

    Answer: Potentially, yes. If your company is required to comply with the Families First Coronavirus Relief Act (FFCRA) and their child meets the criteria listed, they may be able to take up to 12 weeks of Emergency FMLA (EFMLA). However, if you have under 50 employees and meet the qualifications for the small business exemption, your employee may not qualify for EFMLA.

    While the first two weeks of EFMLA are unpaid, the employee can elect to use Emergency Paid Sick Leave (EPSL) during this time. Using these benefits concurrently would entitle the employee to 12 weeks of leave paid at two-thirds their regular rate.

    Question: If an employee contracts COVID-19 and claims they were exposed at work, can they file a workers’ compensation (WC) claim?

    Answer: Yes. Workers compensation benefits are available to employees who become ill while performing services at their workplace. An employee that contracts COVID-19 and that meets the following criteria will most likely be eligible for WC benefits:

    • The employee tested positive for or was diagnosed with COVID19 within 14 days after a day that the employee performed labor or services at the employee’s place of employment at the employer’s direction;
    • The day referenced above was on or after March 19, 2020;
    • The employee was not working from home;
    • A test confirms the diagnosis within 30 days of initial diagnosis.

    *BREAKING NEWS:Governor Newsom issued Executive Order N-62-20 on May 6, 2020. This order states that workers’ compensation benefits are available to employees who become ill with COVID-19, under certain circumstances. We will continue to monitor this order and bring you updates as they are released.

    In Conclusion

    While these questions are all pressing, it is also important to continue to think ahead. What happens if there is a resurgence? Do you have the resources and a plan to prepare for another business closure?

    As has been the case throughout this pandemic, there are frequent and rapid changes. Contact us with your questions and be on the lookout for our next return to work resource.

        
    April 2020
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    Health Insurance Carriers Position Regarding Cost Sharing for COVID-19

    Major health insurance carriers have released updated information regarding costs associated with COVID-19. As has been previously communicated, all health plans must provide no-cost coverage for COVID-19 testing. However, major carriers are extending that benefit and will waive co-pays or other costs associated with medical treatment, even if the member has to stay in the hospital.

    Anthem Blue Cross: Anthem will expand coverage, effective April 1, for members in its affiliated health plans undergoing treatment related to a COVID-19 diagnosis. The expansion covers the waiver of cost share for COVID-19 treatment received through May 31, 2020. Click here to learn more.

    Blue Shield of California: Blue Shield has announced that it will cover members’ coinsurance, copayments, and deductibles for COVID-19 medical treatments through May 31, 2020. Click here to learn more.

    Kaiser: Kaiser Permanente is waiving member out-of-pocket costs for inpatient and outpatient services when treating COVID-19. Click here to learn more.

    UnitedHealthcare (UHC): UHC is waiving member cost-share for the treatment of COVID-19. Click here to learn more.

    Sutter: No update available regarding treatment. Sutter Health Plan will not collect patient cost shares in advance of providing services for medically necessary COVID-19 screening and testing in advance. Click here to learn more.

    Western Health Advantage: No update available regarding treatment. Waived all cost-sharing for medically necessary screening and testing for COVID-19 only. No further details at this time. Click here to learn more.

    The list is current as of today and is not all-inclusive. Please contact your benefits team for information about additional carriers.

    HRDR Corner – Keeping Connected in a Remote Workplace

    COVID-19, aka the coronavirus, has had an impact on just about every single person in the world. Most importantly, your employees. Now, more than ever, engaging your employees will be critical for the health of your people and your organization.

    Some of your workforce may be used to working remotely already. For others, this may be brand new. While the allure of working in your slippers is initially strong, the transition to working at home can be a challenge. It may lead to general disengagement, reduced productivity and an overall decline in motivation. How can managers prevent this from happening to their employees?

    Missed our post? Read it here.

    UPDATED - FFCRA Flow Chart and Benefit Eligibility

    As new information about the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) is being released, we will continue to keep you informed of changes. Click here to access reference charts that have recently been revised. Contact the HR team if you have questions.

        
    April 2020
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    CARES Act Expands Use of Flexible-Use Dollars

    Good news! The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) has expanded the use of Health Saving Account (HSA) and Health Flexible Spending Account (Health FSA) dollars to include certain medical expenses and over-the-counter medicines without a prescription. This is a reversal of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) restrictions on the use of these funds.

    Employees will now be able to purchase items such as pain relievers, antacids, allergy medication, feminine hygiene, and even acne treatments without a prescription. It is important to note that vitamins and supplements will most likely still require a prescription or letter of medical necessity stating that they are being used to treat a diagnosed medical condition.

    The most convenient change is that employees will now be able to use their HSA debit cards to make these purchases. This means that you can go to Target and purchase your favorite allergy medication with your HSA card as opposed to filing for reimbursement after you incur the expense and without a prescription.

    While this change was retroactive to January 1, 2020, stores will need time to implement this change in their point-of-sale systems. If you attempt to make a qualified purchase but your HSA card is declined, you will be required to use another form of payment and submit for reimbursement afterwards. These system updates could take until the end of May.

    New Posting Requirement for Restaurant Industry

    Executive Order N-51-20 ("COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave") signed by Governor Newsom has expanded paid sick leave to food industry employees who work for a company with 500 or more employees nationwide. The Department of Industrial Relations says covered employees range from "farmworkers to those workers who work in the retail food supply chain, including pick-up, delivery, supply, packaging, retail, or preparation."

    Covered employees are required to provide a new notice to their employees that can be found here. This can be included alongside your 2020 compliance poster.

    Additional information can be found here.

    Returning to Work Post-Coronavirus

    As we watch other states start to re-open their doors, we are working diligently to compile the most accurate data for California employers. We will continue to update you as new information is made available. Keep an eye out for our “return to work” publication, coming soon! You can also reach out to a member of the HR consulting team as questions arise.

    Mental Health & Wellness Resources

    May is Mental Health Awareness month. As we enter into a month focused on the mental health of one another, it is important to highlight the resources that may be available. Mental health is of great importance as we navigate the impact of COVID-19. People may be working remotely for the first time, dealing with feelings of isolation, along with the concerns over finances and childcare and their own general health.

    An Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is a voluntary, work-based program that offers assessments, counseling, and other services to employees who may have personal or work-related concerns. If you already have an EAP, your carrier may offer expanded benefits as a result of COVID-19.

    In addition to an EAP, your medical plan carrier may offer additional resources for members covering wellness, mental health, stress management and more. Reach out to the benefits team for specifics on your plan.

    If you are looking for other resources regarding mental health support and self care for your workforce, contact the HR team for guidance. In addition, the state has launched special content with an array health and wellness resources. You can find those here.

    Office Closure: Memorial Day

    Benefits Done Right and HR Done Right will be closed Monday, May 25, 2020 in observance of the Memorial Day holiday. We will respond to all emails and voicemails when normal business hours resume on Tuesday, May 26, 2020.

        
    April 2020
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    COVID-19 updates from the Done Right team

    The amount of information that has been released over the past weeks related to COVID-19 is immense. Today we highlight the most recent clarifications from the Department of Labor (DOL) as it relates to Emergency Paid Sick Leave, Emergency Family Medical Leave and what businesses may qualify for an exemption. For the backstory, refer to our earlier communications. You can also reference the updated DOL FAQ’s for details not included here. If you, like so many, find the DOL pages overwhelming, please reach out to your consulting team.

    Q: If my business operations are shut down, do I need to provide the Emergency Paid Sick Leave (EPSL) and/or Emergency Family Medical Leave Act (EFMLA) to my employees?
    A: No. If your business is no longer operating due to lack of business or because of a federal, state, or local order, you are not required to pay these benefits. Employees that have been sent home and are no longer being paid are not eligible. Your employees should file for unemployment in this scenario.

    Q: I own a small business. Am I exempt from providing EFMLA and/or EPSL to my employees?
    A: Maybe. While there was speculation that small businesses with less than 50 employees would be able to claim an exemption from providing both of these leaves, this is no longer the case. The very narrow exemption only applies to employers with a proven hardship that allows you to not pay EPSL or EFMLA only due to a child being at home because a school or place of care is closed. You would also need to prove that providing these leaves would be detrimental to your business's continued operations.

    If this is the case, you should document your reasoning for each criteria and be prepared to submit the information for approval. This process is still being determined. Further clarification is expected later this week.

    The DOL has determined that an employer may claim this exemption if an authorized business official has determined that:

    • The provision of paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave would result in the small business’s expenses and financial obligations exceeding available business revenues and cause the small business to cease operating at a minimal capacity; or
    • The absence of the employee or employees requesting paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave would entail a substantial risk to the financial health or operational capabilities of the small business because of their specialized skills, knowledge of the business, or responsibilities; or
    • There are not sufficient workers who are able, willing, and qualified, and who will be available at the time and place needed, to perform the labor or services provided by the employee or employees requesting paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave, and these labor or services are needed for the small business to operate at a minimal capacity.

    A company may decide to claim an exemption if the following criteria are met:

    • employer employs fewer than 50 employees; and
    • leave is requested because the child’s school or place of care is closed, or child care provider is unavailable, due to COVID-19 related reasons; and
    • an authorized officer of the business has determined that at least one of the three conditions described in the previous section is met.

    As the employer, you are encouraged to work with your employees to determine the best solution for ensuring safety and maintaining business operations.

    Q: My employees are still able to work their regularly scheduled hours by telecommuting but require an adjusted schedule. Am I required to pay them EPSL or EFMLA?
    A: Not necessarily. If an employee is able to complete their regularly scheduled work within the same hours allotment, they would not be eligible for these benefits.

    If an employee with a qualifying reason is unable to telecommute or perform their regular work, the employee would be eligible to receive EPSL.

    If an employee is unable to telecommute or complete the required working hours due to a child being at home whose school or day care has been closed, they would be eligible to receive EFMLA benefits.

    Note: Documentation is required from the employee when requesting leave. Please contact your consultant for additional details.

    This is a lot of information to digest and more is expected as we get further down the road. If you have specific questions or would like clarification on how to handle your workforce, please reach out to a consultant.

        
    DOL Updates Released
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    Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) Resources

    The Department of Labor (DOL) just released a Q&A that addresses many of the questions we have received from clients. The full list of questions can be found here. A significant clarification is the effective date of the FFCRA is April 1 as opposed to April 2.

    The DOL has also released the required notice which can be found here. We recommend you distribute this to your employees and post next to your compliance poster as soon as possible. In addition to the posting, the DOL has released helpful pages for employers and employees.

    We have also included a helpful flow chart to help determine if your employees are eligible for Emergency FMLA or Emergency Paid Sick Leave which can be accessed by clicking here.

    Unemployment Insurance Resources

    Many of you have questions regarding unemployment insurance benefits as you assess your short and long term business plans. In weighing options, you may want to explore EDD’s Work Share Program. Work Share allows eligible employees of participating employers to receive the percentage of their weekly Unemployment Insurance benefit amount that equals the percentage of the reduction in normal hours and wages for that week. Additional information can be found here.

    The Done Right team is here to support you and your employees. Contact the HR team if you have HR related questions. Contact the benefits team for assistance with eligibility or help understanding your plan benefits and coverage.

    We appreciate your patience if our response time is longer than usual. We will continue to keep you current as the situation progresses.

        
    Febuary 2020
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    New Form I-9 Released

    The U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services (USCIS) released the new version of the Form I-9 on January 31, 2020. The previous version expired in August, but employers were advised to continue using this version until the new form was released. All employers must begin using the new form by May 1, 2020.

    While the paper version of the form did not change, the electronic version saw minor updates. A list of the changes can be found here.

    HRDR Corner – Is Direct Deposit Putting You at Risk?

    "It\'s my money and I need it now!" Perhaps you recognize this phrase from a popular television commercial. Instant gratification is something that many people feel on a regular basis, especially on pay day. The idea of picking up a paper paycheck on a Friday, driving to the bank, then waiting 3 days for the funds to clear is a thing of the past. Direct deposit has become the new normal.

    Missed our post? Read it here.

    Harassment Prevention Training – Registration is Open!

    Governor Brown expanded the harassment prevention training requirement to employers with five or more employees effective in 2019. These employers are now required to provide training to all employees. An extension has been granted by Governor Newsom, giving employers until January 1, 2021.

    Our next manager/supervisor session will be held on March 18. Click here to register.

    Our next non-supervisory session will be held on April 29. Click here to register.

    Want more information on how to comply with training requirements? Interested in custom onsite training? Contact us here.

    OSHA 300A Form Posting Requirements

    Most employers are required to post the OSHA Form 300A from February 1 – April 30 every year. Employers that are classified with a low-hazard Standard Industrial Classification code or have 10 or fewer employees are exempt from posting.

    If there were no recordable incidences in the previous year, the summary form must still be posted with zeros. The form should be posted in an area frequented by employees, usually close to the compliance postings

    Thank You for Attending!

    We had the honor and pleasure of hosting a 2020 legal update on Wednesday, January 29 in Sacramento. Thank you to all who were able to join us.

    If you have any ideas or topics that you would like us to discuss in our future events, we would love to hear from you. Plans for our next event are already underway. Stay tuned for more information!

    Holiday Office Closure

    Benefits Done Right and HR Done Right will be closed Monday, February 17 in observance of the Presidents' Day holiday. We will return to the office on Tuesday, February 18.

        
    January 2020
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    You're Invited: Employment Law Update Event 2020

    2019 was a busy year for the California legislature. Join us on January 29 as we recap what you need to know as a California employer. Alden Parker, Regional Managing Partner - Fisher Phillips, will speak to the most important changes that will impact almost every company, regardless of size, throughout the state.

    Registration will fill up fast. Click here to reserve your seat today.

    HRDR Blog – Introductory Period vs. Probationary Period of Employment in California

    Upon hire, many employers have a defined period of time where the employee is able to learn how to perform the job on a regular basis. The terms “introductory period” or “probationary period” may be used. What’s the difference between these terms, and how should a California employer classify this period?

    Missed our post? Read it here.

    Updates to Required Notices

    With the new year comes updates to many of the California required documents. Employers are required to give these notices upon hire, termination, or other employment changes such as a leave of absence. Your HR team is available to guide you on which notices to use in each scenario.

    While many of the updates are included with a 2020 compliance poster, some are standalone pamphlets or notices.

    Still have pamphlets from last year? Check the date of the document before you toss them out. If there is a newer version, the old versions should be destroyed and replaced immediately.

    Contact your HR team if you have questions on the updates or need to order your 2020 compliance poster.

    Decrease to the IRS Standard Mileage Rate

    The IRS standard mileage reimbursement rate for business travel saw a decrease in 2020 compared to 2019. Effective January 1, 2020, the standard rate is 57.5 cents, down from the 2019 rate of 58 cents. This rate should be used when calculating the reimbursement to an employee for miles driven for business purposes.

        
    December 2019
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    Save the Date: Employment Law Update Event 2020

    Join us for an employment law event in Sacramento, January 29. Alden Parker, Regional Managing Partner from Fisher Phillips will highlight the most important changes for employers in 2020. Mark your calendar, this is not one to miss! Registration will open soon.

    HR Corner: Are You Prepared for 2020?

    This is the time of year when many people reflect on the year and revisit personal goals and tasks they planned to accomplish. The same is true with business. Legislative bills signed by the governor this year will take effect in January. There are new laws regarding independent contractors, lactation accommodation, organ donor leave, paid family leave (effective 7/1/2020), and harassment prevention training, just to name a few.

    Missed our blog post? Read it here.

    Extended Deadline for Furnishing (But Not Filing) 2019 ACA Form 1095-B and Form 1095-C

    On December 2, 2019, the IRS issued Notice 2019-63, which extends the due date for certain Affordable Care Act (ACA) information reporting requirements for insurers, self-insured plan sponsors, and “applicable large employers.” Specifically, the IRS is extending the deadline for furnishing 2019 Form 1095-B and 2019 Form 1095-C to individuals by 30 days—from January 31, 2020 to March 2, 2020.

    Notice 2019-63 does not, however, extend the deadline for filing the 2019 forms with the IRS. The IRS filing deadline remains March 31, 2020 if filing electronically (or February 28, 2020 if filing by paper).

    Despite the extension, the IRS is encouraging reporting entities to furnish Form 1095-B and 1095-C statements as soon as they are able.

    “Good Faith” Compliance Standard Extended to 2019 In addition to extending the due date for furnishing forms to individuals, Notice 2019-63 also extends the “good faith” transition relief from penalties to 2019 reporting. Under the transition relief, employers and other reporting entities will not be penalized for providing incorrect or incomplete information on the 2019 forms if they can demonstrate that they have made good faith efforts to comply with the reporting requirements.

    In determining whether a reporting entity reported in “good faith,” the IRS will take into account whether the reporting entity made reasonable efforts to prepare for reporting (such as gathering and transmitting the necessary data to an agent to prepare the data for submission to the IRS, or testing its ability to transmit to the IRS). The IRS will also take into account whether the reporting entity is taking steps to ensure that it will be able to comply with the reporting requirements for 2020.

    Impact on Individual Taxpayers The IRS recognizes that taxpayers may not receive their Form 1095-B or Form 1095-C by the time they are ready to file their 2019 income tax returns due to the deadline extension. Like last year, taxpayers do not need to wait to receive their Form 1095-B and/or 1095-C in order to file their tax returns.

    Even though the individual mandate penalty was reduced to $0 in 2019, taxpayers will need to attest on their tax returns as to whether they were eligible for a Marketplace subsidy. Instead of waiting for the Form 1095-B or form 1095-C, they may rely on other information received from their employer. They do not need to send their Form 1095-B, 1095-C or any information they relied upon in completing their 2019 tax return to the IRS, but should keep that information with their tax records.

    States with an individual mandate (i.e., Massachusetts – 2006, New Jersey – 2019 and California – 2020) remain in effect despite the elimination of the ACA's individual mandate.

    Have questions about how this impacts your company? Contact a member of the account management team today.

    2020 Compliance Posters: Order Today

    2020 will be here before we know it. Contact your HR Done Right team today if you would like to order updated compliance posters.

    Office Closure

    Our offices will be closed December 24 through Friday, December 27 and Monday, December 30 through Wednesday, January 1 in observance of the Christmas and New Year holidays. Normal business hours will resume on Thursday, January 2, 2020.

        
    October 2019
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    Welcome Karen Drew!


    We are happy to announce and welcome Karen Drew, SPHR, PHRca, SHRM-SCP, to our consulting team. Karen brings 23+ years’ private sector HR experience within the Sacramento region to HR Done Right. She’s worn many hats from Generalist to Manager to Consultant. She received her bachelor’s degree in Organizational Communications and Minor in Business Administration from California State University, Sacramento. Originally from the bay area, Karen enjoys spending her spare time at the coast with her family and their Havanese, Baxter.

    Susan can be reached at 888-805-5421 x248 or kdrew@hrdoneright.com.
    HRDR Blog - Salary Threshold Increase for 2020

    Last week, the US Department of Labor announced an increase to the federal salary threshold for the “white-collar” exemptions from overtime pay. As of January 1, 2020, the weekly salary threshold increases from $455 to $684. If an employee does not meet the exemption requirements, they are eligible for overtime. As 2020 approaches, now is the time to review your exemption classifications and make changes, if necessary.

    Missed our blog post? Read it here.

    Final Session for 2020 - Harassment Prevention Training

    Governor Brown expanded the harassment prevention training requirement to employers with five or more employees effective in 2019. These employers are now required to provide training to all employees. An extension has been granted by Governor Newsom, giving employers until January 1, 2021.

    Our final session of the year for managers/supervisors will be held on November 6. Click here to register.

    Question of the Month: Should I Host a Holiday Party for My Employees?

    Sometimes it’s a challenge to please everyone. As we approach the holiday season, many companies like to host events for employees to wrap up the year and say “thank you” for all of their efforts. Many employees view this as a perk and look forward to this festive time spent with their work families. It speaks to the company culture and can positively contribute to employee retention and morale. It’s a fine line between having a “boring” party that employees feel obligated to attend and a morale booster that the team will always remember.

    Decisions should be made about the event, such as if it will be held during working hours or after hours, location and whether or not alcoholic beverages will be offered. There is always an element of risk that should be evaluated by organizations when making these decisions. Remember, even if the event is held offsite and/or after working hours, it is still considered a company sponsored event.

    No matter what type of event an organization chooses to host, a good rule of thumb is to spell out the expectations for employees in advance. Providing a reminder of the dress code and behavioral guidelines is a good idea. The goal is for all to enjoy the company function, while remembering that they are socializing with co-workers.

    If you have a scenario not addressed in this article, contact a consultant for guidance.

    HRDR Out & About - 2019 Best Places to Work


    Thank you to the Sacramento Business Journal for hosting a great event on October 10. Karen Drew and Kimberly Parker enjoyed networking with the honorees and other attendees.
        
    August 2019
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    HRDR Blog - Pre-Tax vs Post-Tax: Are You Deducting Properly?

    To be pre-tax or to be post-tax, that is the question. At least, that is the question when it comes to payroll deductions. While every payroll deduction can be classified as either pre- or post- tax, how does an employer correctly classify these deductions? While several are classified by IRS regulations, other deductions are a matter of choice.

    Missed our blog post? Read it here.

    Harassment Prevention Training

    Governor Brown passed SB 1343 which expands the requirements for harassment prevention training for California employers. Employers with five or more employees are required to provide training to all employees by January 1, 2020.

    Our next manager/supervisor session will be held on September 11. Click here to register.

    Our next non-supervisory session will be held on October 16. Click here to register.

    Legal Update: Definition of Race Expanded to Include Hairstyles

    Governor Gavin Newsom signed SB 188 prohibiting discrimination based on natural hairstyles associated with race. California is the first state to adopt this law. SB 188, also referred to as the CROWN Act (Create a Respectful and Open Workplace for Natural hair), expands the definition of race under California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) to state “inclusive of traits historically associated with race, including but not limited to, hair texture and protective hairstyles.” Protective hairstyles include but are not limited to afros, braids, or dreadlocks.

    SB 188 goes into effect on January 1, 2020. Now is the time for employers to review their personal appearance policies to ensure they are up to date.

    A consultant is available to assist you with a review.

    Office Closure

    HR Done Right will be closed Monday, September 2 in observance of the Labor Day holiday. Normal business hours will resume at 8:00am on Tuesday, September 3.

        
    July 2019
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    HRDR Blog - Mid Year Spot Check

    As we enter the second half of 2019, now is the perfect time for a mid-year checkup of changes that may affect your business. Our July blog post covers the updated EEO reporting requirements, July minimum wage increases, EEO training and more.

    Missed our blog post? Read it here.

    Harassment Prevention Training

    Governor Brown passed SB 1343 which expands the requirements for harassment prevention training for California employers. Employers with five or more employees are required to provide training to all employees by January 1, 2020.

    Our next supervisor session will be held on August 20. Click here to register.
    Our next employee session will be held on October 16. Click here to register.

    Interested in customized training options at your company location? Contact us for a quote.

    Question of the Month

    Question: What am I required to pay my employee upon separation from the company?

    Answer: All earned but unpaid wages are due to the employee when their employment ends. This includes accrued but unused vacation or paid time off (PTO). Vacation or PTO includes any float days or personal holidays that are vested, which means a “use it or lose it” policy would not apply. Final paychecks must be made available to the employee at the time and place of termination. If the employee has outstanding expenses to be reimbursed by the company, the payment may be made on the next regularly scheduled reimbursement date.

    Be cautious when deducting from an employee’s final paycheck. While the regular, reoccurring deductions are permitted, anything else may be called into question. An employer cannot deduct for any unpaid balance of debt from the employee, even if a written agreement is in place. Examples include negative vacation or PTO balances, the balance of an outstanding loan, or additional unpaid medical premiums. An employer also cannot deduct for the breakage or loss of equipment unless a dishonest act or gross negligence can be proven.

    If you have a scenario not addressed in this article, contact a consultant for guidance.

        
    June 2019
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    HRDR Blog - Pets in the Workplace: Benefit or Pitfall?

    How do you feel leaving your dog at home when you go to work in the morning? Does your dog stare at you with sad eyes and beg you to stay with just one look? What if you were able to bring your dog with you to work? What if you allowed your employees to bring their animals to work?

    Employers in a variety of industries have adopted policies that allow their employees to bring their fur babies to work. However, there are many factors to consider prior to offering this unique benefit.

    Missed our blog post? Read it here.

    EEO & Harassment Prevention Training

    Governor Brown passed SB 1343 which expands the requirements for harassment prevention training for California employers. Employers with five or more employees are required to provide training to all employees by January 1, 2020.

    Our next supervisor session will be held on July 17. Click here to register.

    Interested in customized training options at your company location? Contact us for a quote.

    Protecting Your Employees in the California Heat

    Employees who work outside or in high temperate environments are beginning to feel the effects of the changing weather as summer weather is upon us. Now is the time review your heat illness prevention policy and ensure your employees know how to prevent and respond to heat stress or heat stroke.

    A heat illness prevention policy is not only for employers with outdoor workers. Cal/OSHA states that an “outdoor place of employment is best thought of as one that is not an indoor workplace.” A shed, vehicle with no air conditioning, or a structure with one or more open sides may be considered an outdoor structure. Employers with employees working anywhere other than an indoor environment should implement a heat illness prevention policy. Cal/OSHA defines an indoor environment as “a building that provides sufficient ventilation and cooling, either by natural or mechanical means, and blocks temporary exposure to sunlight.”

    Hydration is key. While remaining hydrated on and off the job is important, employees should be drinking up to four cups of water every hour while working in high temperatures. Water breaks should be taken as often as every 15-20 minutes.

    Meal and rest breaks should be taken in shaded areas or inside, when possible. Employees should eat during their breaks to replenish lost electrolytes.

    Light-colored, loose-fitting, breathable fabric can help your employees maintain a safe body temperature. Consider providing employees with added cooling methods including cold towels, mist stations, or cooling vests.

    Office Closure

    HR Done Right will be closed Thursday, July 4 in observance of the Independence Day holiday. Normal business hours will resume at 8:00 AM on Friday, July 5.

        
    May 2019
    Stay Current Newsletter
     In This Issue:Top
    EEO-1 Pay Data - Reporting Deadline

    As of Friday May 3, the deadline to submit pay data for EEO-1 reporting from 2017 and 2018 is September 30, 2019. This new reporting requirement has been titled “Component 2” data. The US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) will begin accepting data in mid-July, though no specific date has been announced yet.

    What is an EEO-1 report?
    The EEO-1 report must be filed by employers with 100 or more employees and contractors subject to Executive Order 11246. Typically, this report includes information about employee demographics categorized by race/ethnicity, gender and job category. This information has been titled “Component 1” data.

    While the deadline to submit the Component 1 EEO-1 report has historically been March 30 of the following year, the deadline for 2018 data was postponed until May 31, 2019 due to the government shutdown. This deadline remains firm with only Component 2 reporting deadline extended to September 30, 2019.

    What does this recent ruling mean?
    The announcement of the inclusion of pay data comes after much anticipation surrounding the lawsuit National Women’s Law Center v. Office of Management and Budget. In summary, the plaintiff argued the OMB should have been collecting this information for the past several years. To rectify this, the EEOC was ordered to collect pay data (“Component 2 data”) for 2017 and 2018 by September 30, 2019. While an appeal has already been filed, the EEOC has stated that the appeal does not alter the current requirement of submitting the data by the September deadline.

    EEO & Harassment Prevention Training

    Governor Brown passed SB 1343 which expands the requirements for harassment prevention training for California employers. Employers with five or more employees are required to provide training to all employees by January 1, 2020.

    Our next non-supervisory session will be held on June 19. Click here to register.

    Our next supervisor session will be held on July 17. Click here to register.

    Interested in customized training options at your company location? Contact us for a quote.

    Summer Dress Code Standards

    With the hot summer months approaching, we wanted to include a previous article we published regarding summer dress in the workplace.

    A California summer means one thing...heat! Employees would rather be sitting by the pool instead of sitting in their office. To combat the summer blues, many employers have adopted a summer dress code policy. Whether you already have one or you are looking to implement one, there are a few key factors to consider.

    Safety should be the first priority. While summer sandals are fun to wear, they may not be compatible with your work environment. Loose clothing can also be a hazard when working around machinery. Having specific items that are prohibited listed in your policy can help alleviate questions that may arise.

    While jeans and a tank top might be acceptable for some employees, those in a client or customer facing role might have different standards. It is important for your policy to state that employees should dress appropriately for their day.

    While summer in California can seem like it lasts all year, we recommend including applicable dates for your summer dress code. Many employers use Memorial Day to Labor Day as a general practice.

    Your consultant is available to assist you with drafting a summer dress code policy.

    Office Closure

    HR Done Right will be closed Monday, May 27 in observance of the Memorial Day holiday. Normal business hours will resume at 8:00 AM on Tuesday, May 28.

        
    April 2019
    Stay Current Newsletter
     In This Issue:Top
    Updates to Required Notices

    California has another update to labor law posters effective April 1, 2019. The “Family Care and Medical Leave and Pregnancy Disability Leave” notice has an updated title and includes information about the New Parent Leave Act (NPLA) that went into effect last year. In addition to the labor law poster, two California pamphlets have also been updated: the Paid Family Leave pamphlet and the Disability Insurance pamphlet.

    EEO & Harassment Prevention Training

    Governor Brown passed SB 1343 which expands the requirements for harassment prevention training for California employers. Employers with five or more employees are required to provide training to all employees by January 1, 2020. Our next in person session for supervisors and managers is now open for registration. Click here to register.

    Interested in customized training options at your company location? Contact us for a quote.

    Good People Know Good People – Employee Referral Programs

    In today’s job market, finding good candidates can be a challenge. The federal unemployment rate has been holding steady at 3.8% for the past two months and the California unemployment rate was only 4.2% in February. Implementing an employee referral program is a positive way to financially incentivize employees to spread the word about open positions.

    Clear guidelines and expectations are important aspects of a successful referral program. Employees should know who is eligible to participate and what they can expect if they successfully refer someone. According to a survey completed at Human Capital Institute (HCI), 78% of companies provide the same financial reward for all positions. This can reduce the risk of one job seeming more important than another.

    Arm your employees with key information about the position that they can then share with their potential referral. This may include salary range, desired traits, specific certifications or education, as well as previous work experience. Another way to incentivize your employees is to provide “instant gratification.” Instead of dispersing the full reward after a designated amount of time after hire, employers may want to consider providing half of the reward upon hire and the remaining balance upon completion of an introductory period.

    Implementing a structured referral program can turn your employees into recruiting machines! A consultant is available to assist you with creating and implementing an employee referral program for your company.

        
    March 2019
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    Office Closure

    Our offices are in the final stages of renovation. We will be closed on Friday, March 15 for new paint and carpet installation. We will be back in business Monday, March 18. Thank you for your patience through this process. We look forward to sharing our updated space in the future!

    Harassment Prevention Training

    Governor Brown passed SB 1343 which expands the requirements for harassment prevention training for California employers. Employers with five or more employees are required to provide training to all employees by January 1, 2020.

    Click here to register for our next manager/supervisor session on May 15. Click here to register for our next employee session on June 19. Interested in customized training options at your company location? Contact us for a quote.

    HR News: Reporting Time Pay Rules May Apply to On-Call Employees Who Don’t Report to Work

    A recent court decision in Ward V Tilly’s Inc. (CA Court of Appeal, 2nd district) on February 4, 2019 puts an interesting spin on the meaning of “reporting time pay” and how “on-call” employees must be compensated. If you have on-call employees, it is important to examine your practices to ensure you will not be on the hook for additional wages when they are not given work.

    “Reporting time pay” is required in California when an employee shows up to work for a shift and is sent home before working at least one-half of the scheduled day’s work. When this occurs, the employee is owed one-half of their usual or scheduled shift, but no less than two hours and no more than four hours. Until the Ward v. Tilly’s decision, reporting time pay has been applied to employees who physically show up to their shifts.

    Typically, “on-call” employees are given a time frame when they are waiting to be called into work and/or required to respond to a call. When they are called into a shift and/or the work is performed, they are paid for the hours worked. In this case, applied to Wage Order 7-2001 (Mercantile Industry), the court ruled that employees must be given “reporting time pay” when required to call in two hours before a shift to learn whether they were needed for work, and then were told that no work was available (and not to come in for the day.) The court’s reasoning was that an employee who was required to call in two hours before a shift could not schedule personal activities and did not fully have use of this personal time. Therefore, the requirement to call in was a form of “reporting time”.

    Even though this is the only published appellate decision in California addressing this specific issue, California employers are now bound by the Ward decision. The ruling applies to all Wage Orders, not just Wage Order 7-2001. We recommend that you review and revise your reporting policies and on-call procedures accordingly to avoid liability.

    Sutter Health - Anthem Blue Cross Negotiation Update

    Anthem notified Sutter’s HMO patients that they will be reassigned to a non-Sutter doctor effective April 1, 2019, unless a new agreement is reached before that date. Patients enrolled in Anthem’s PPO plans that include Sutter affiliated providers will continue to have access to the Sutter network at in-network benefit levels through June 30, 2019.

    Click here for the list of Sutter hospitals and medical foundations. We will provide additional updates as negotiations continue. Regular updates are also available at www.SutterHealth.org/Anthem.

        
    February 2019
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    Please Pardon Our Dust and Office Closure

    Please pardon our dust as our office space will be getting an update! We will be closing early to accommodate the general contractor as follows:

    Friday, February 15 Closing at noon
    Friday, February 22 Closing at noon

    We will also be closed for the Presidents’ Day Holiday Monday, February 18. Our team will respond promptly when business hours resume.

    IRS Deadline Fast Approaching

    The IRS deadlines for filing and furnishing Forms 1094 and 1095 are fast approaching.
    As a reminder:

    1. Employers with 50 or more full-time employees (including full-time equivalent employees) generally must furnish a Form 1095-C to all full-time employees no later than March 4, 2019.
    2. Self-insured employers with fewer than 50 or more full-time employees (including full-time equivalent employees) generally must furnish a Form 1095-B to all responsible individuals—typically the primary insured, an employee or former employee, or other related person named on the application for insurance—no later than March 4, 2019.
    3. All Forms 1094 and 1095 must be filed with the IRS no later than February 28, 2019 (or April 1, 2019, if filing electronically).

    Article republished with permission from HR360.

    Register Now: Harassment Prevention Training

    Governor Brown passed SB 1343 which expands the requirements for harassment prevention training for California employers. Employers with five or more employees are required to provide training to all employees by January 1, 2020. Our next in person session for supervisors and managers is now open for registration. Click here to register.

    Interested in customized training options at your company location? Contact us for a quote.

    HR Corner: Introductory Period vs. Probationary Period of Employment in California

    Upon hire, many employers have a defined period of time where the employee is able to learn how to perform the job on a regular basis. The terms “introductory period” or “probationary period” may be used. What’s the difference between these terms, and how should a California employer classify this period?

    As an at-will state, an employee or the employer may end the employment relationship at any time. A probationary period may unintentionally imply that there is a promise of continued employment upon satisfactory completion of this period. This could lead to potential claims of wrongful termination if an employee feels an agreement was broken.

    Instead of a probationary period, an employer can implement an introductory period. This is a period of time where the employer can determine if the employee can perform the job duties satisfactorily as well as if the employee is a cultural fit for the company. Your company policy should include verbiage stating that a successful completion of an introductory period does not supersede the at-will employment status. Interested in implementing an introductory period, but want to be compliant? Contact your HR consulting team for guidance.

        
    January 2019
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    UPDATE - 2019 Compliance Posters

    The Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) has just released updated language to the “Discrimination and Harassment” posting. If you order compliance posters from your payroll company or a similar vendor, contact them to request a new poster.

    You may also contact us to order updated compliance posters. We will continue to keep you updated if there are additional revisions.

    2019 Training Program

    The HR Done Right team will be offering expanded training sessions in 2019 at our Sacramento office. Governor Brown passed SB 1343 which expands the requirements for harassment prevention training for California employers. Employers with five or more employees will be required to provide training to all employees by January 1, 2020.

    A two-hour supervisory session will be held on February 5, 2019 beginning at 8:30am. There are a few seats remaining. Click here to register.

    A one-hour employee session will be held on February 27, 2019 at 8:30am. Click here to register.

    Interested in customized training options at your company location? Contact us for a quote.

    HRDR Blog: Have You Reviewed Your Leave Policies for 2019?

    A change to the use of paid time off while taking a leave that falls under Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) or California Family Rights Act (CFRA) regulations means employers should review and update their applicable leave policies.

    Missed our post? Read it here.

    OSHA Form 300A Requirement

    Most employers are required to post the OSHA Form 300A from February 1 – April 30 every year. Employers that are classified with a low-hazard Standard Industrial Classification code or have 10 or fewer employees are exempt from posting.

    If there were no recordable incidences in the previous year, the summary form must still be posted with zeros. The form should be posted in an area frequented by employees, usually close to the compliance postings.

    Office Closure

    HR Done Right will be closed Monday, February 18 in observance of the Presidents’ Day holiday. Normal business hours will resume at 8:00 AM on Tuesday, February 19.

    Back to Top
        
    December 2018
    Stay Current Newsletter
     In This Issue:Top
    2019 Compliance Posters

    2019 is around the corner. Contact your HR Done Right Team today if you would like to order updated compliance posters.

    Updated IRS Standard Mileage Rate

    The IRS standard mileage reimbursement rate for business travel will see a substantial increase in 2019 compared to prior years. Effective January 1, 2019, the standard rate will increase to 58 cents from the 2018 rate of 54.5 cents. This rate should be used when calculating the reimbursement to an employee for miles driven for business purposes.

    HRDR Blog: California Minimum Wage Increases—The Impact to Hourly and Exempt Employees

    The California minimum wage will reach $15.00 an hour for all employers by January 1, 2023. Until then, Californians will see incremental increases of one dollar per year. Effective January 1, 2019, the minimum wage for employers with 26 or more employees increases to $12.00 per hour and $11.00 per hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees. Even if all your employees make more than minimum wage, there still may be action required.

    Missed our post? Read it here.

    2019 Training Program

    The HR Done Right team will be offering expanded training sessions in 2019 at our Sacramento office. Governor Brown passed SB 1343 which expands the requirements for harassment prevention training for California employers. Employers with five or more employees will be required to provide training to all employees by January 1, 2020.

    A two-hour supervisory session will be held on February 5, 2019 beginning at 9:00am. A one-hour employee session will be held on February 27, 2019 at 9:00am. Registration will open soon.

    Interested in customized training options at your company location? Contact us for a quote.

    HRDR’s Julie Worley Board Appointment

    Julie Worley has accepted a volunteer position on the CalSHRM board. CalSHRM is the statewide affiliate for the Society for Human Resource Management. Julie will serve as the Professional Development Director for two years starting January 1, 2019. Congratulations, Julie!

    Office Closure

    HR Done Right will be closed Tuesday, December 25 through Friday, December 28 and Monday, December 31, 2018 - January 1, 2019 in observance of the Christmas and New Year holiday. Normal business hours will resume at 8:00 AM on Wednesday, January 2, 2019.

        
    November 2018
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     In This Issue:Top
    Welcome HR Consultant, Susan Breslauer!


    HR Done Right is happy to announce and welcome Susan Breslauer, SPHR, PHRca to the HR consulting team. She brings more than 30 years’ HR experience in both the private and public sectors, with the past 15 years in an HR consulting role. Much of Susan’s work has focused on compliance, benefits, compensation, payroll and HR information systems. She holds a BS from the University of California, Berkeley in Social Science with an emphasis in Human Resources Management.

    Susan can be reached at 888-805-5421 x248 or sbreslauer@hrdoneright.com.
    HRDR Blog: Are You Compliant with Expanded Accommodation Requirements?

    Current California law states that all employers must make reasonable efforts to provide employees with a room to express breast milk, “other than a toilet stall.” This room must be private and near the employee’s work area. Employers must also provide a reasonable amount of time for the employee to express milk.

    Missed our post? Read it here.

    2019 Training Program

    The HR Done Right team will be offering expanded training sessions in 2019 at our Sacramento office. Governor Brown passed SB 1343 which expands the requirements for harassment prevention training for California employers. Employers with five or more employees will be required to provide training to all employees by January 1, 2020.

    A two-hour supervisory session will be held on February 5, 2019 beginning at 9:00am. A one-hour employee session will be held on February 27, 2019 at 9:00am. Registration will open soon.

    Interested in customized training options at your company location? Contact us for a quote.

    Office Closure

    HR Done Right will be closed Thursday, November 22 and Friday, November 23 in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. Normal business hours will resume at 8:00 AM on Monday, November 26.

        
    October 2018
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     In This Issue:Top
    Thank You for Attending the Fall Employer Seminar

    HR Done Right and Benefits Done Right had the honor and pleasure of hosting the Fall Employer Seminar on Wednesday, October 3 at Piatti. Thank you to all who were able to join us. If there are topics you would like us to consider for future events, we would love to hear from you. Plans for our next event are already underway. Stay tuned for more information!.

    2019 Compliance Posters

    2019 is around the corner. Contact your HR Done Right Team today if you would like to pre-order updated compliance posters.

    The "#MeToo Effect" on California Legislation

    The #MeToo movement was born soon after the explosive New York Times feature exposing extensive allegations of sexual harassment against Harry Weinstein. Since then, we have seen many other public figures brought into the spotlight including actors, politicians, TV personalities and comedians.

    Missed our post? Read it here.

    Expanded Training Requirements Coming Soon!

    Governor Brown passed SB 1343 which expands the requirements for harassment prevention training for California employers. Employers with 5 or more employees will be required to provide training to all employees by January 1, 2020.

    The HR Done Right team will be offering expanded training sessions in 2019 at our Sacramento office. Contact us if you have questions regarding the new training requirements or to request sessions delivered at your company location.

    HRDR Out & About - 2018 Best Places to Work


    Thank you to the Sacramento Business Journal for hosting a great event on October 11. We were proud to support an event honoring our region’s top workplaces.

    Pictured at our exhibitor table is HR Consultant, Julie Worley and founder, Laurie Rood. <